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2007-10-04-01 Autosomal dominant polycystic renal disease © Cuillier www.thefetus.net/
Autosomal dominant polycystic renal disease

Fabrice Cuillier, MD*; C. Vergt, MD**; N. Mounet-Raynaud, MD***.

*

Department of Gynecology, Félix Guyon"Hospital, 97400 Saint-Denis, Ile de la Réunion, France;

**

Department of Gynecology, Félix Guyon"Hospital, 97400 Saint-Denis, Ile de la Réunion, France;

***

Gynecologist, Chaussee Street, 97450 Saint-Paul.

 

A 22-year-old woman presented to our unit at 31st week of pregnancy. She and her husband suffer from autosomal dominant polycystic renal disease. Her first and second ultrasounds performed at 13 and 22 weeks were normal. Biochemical triple test wasn"t done.

At 31st week we found oligohydramnios and brightly hyperechogenic kidneys. The rest of the fetal morphology and the fetal growth were normal. The kidney appeared hyperechoic, but the cortico-medullar differentiation was preserved. The neonate was delivered at 38 weeks (2200 g). Its creatinin levels were normal. Postnatal ultrasonography confirmed the diagnosis.

The final diagnosis was the autosomal dominant polycystic renal disease (type III of Potter classification).

Images 1, 2: 31st week of pregnancy; transverse scans at the level of the fetal kidneys show their hyperechoic appearance. Oligohydramnios was also present.

 

Images 3, 4: 31st week of pregnancy; parasagittal (Image 3) and transverse (Image 4) scans at the level of the fetal kidneys show their hyperechoic appearance. Oligohydramnios was also present.

 

Images 5, 6: 34st week of pregnancy; parasagittal scans at the level of the fetal kidneys show their hyperechoic appearance. Oligohydramnios was also present.

 

Images 7: Image shows the ultrasound appearance of mother"s kidney (autosomal dominant polycystic renal disease).

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